Native forests, worth more standing

 

From water supply to wildlife, our forests are our life support

Water supply

forest use values

Wildlife

Fires

It’s time to protect our native forests.

Whichever way you look at it, from an economic perspective to an environmental perspective, our native forests are worth far more  to Victoria when left standing. From water supply to tourism and ecology, our native forests are huge natural systems which help sustain all of us.

We welcome you to explore the many short videos below, covering all facets of native forests, their importance and true ecological and economic values. 

It’s time to protect our native forests.

 

 

Our old forests produce the most water and the best quality water.

Melbourne is headed toward future water shortages. So what is the water in Melbourne’s forests worth? And how can we maximise this precious resource? 

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

Water supply and tourism values.

Research conducted by the Australian National University has applied a UN framework of environmental economic accounting to evaluate the economic benefits to region from the different activities.

Protecting habitat means protecting forests.

What makes a viable reserve system to protect an ecosystem and its species? Professor David Lindenmayer of the Australian National University discusses how big a reserve should be when it comes to the mountain ash forests of the Victorian Central Highlands.

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

The importance of large old trees.

Prof David Lindenmayer from The Australian National University talks about the essential role that large old trees play in the forests of the Victorian Central Highlands, and also why we should be worried about them. 

The importance of tree ferns.

Tree ferns play an important role in Australia’s mountain ash forests. Professor David Lindenmayer from the Australian National University gives us a brief run down on what makes them so special.

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

Threatened Species Recovery Hub

The importance of fallen logs in the forest.

Fallen trees on the floor of forests store large amounts of water, create habitat for a wide range of animals and are vital for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. Professor David Lindenmayer of the Australian National University talks about the importance of logs on the forest floor to the ecology of forests.

Older wetter forests are better fire defence.

Is there a relationship between native forest logging and bushfires? These questions, and more, are unpacked and answered in a detailed interview with world-leading forest ecologist Professor Lindenmayer.

forest hub

great forest national park

Warburton Environment supports The Great Forest National Park.

The Great Forest National Park is a proposal to combine more than 10 smaller parks into a world-class reserve just east of Melbourne. The park will complete a biolinks plan to cradle Melbourne, safeguarding our key ecological assets and social values; water, food bowl security, regional jobs, recreational opportunities and wildlife sanctuaries.

Always look for the FSC logo on products.

When you see the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) symbol on a product, it’s your guarantee that the product is sourced from sustainable forests. 

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